photo - In this Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, photo, an Amazon employee makes sure a box riding on a belt is not sticking out at the Amazon Fulfillment center in Robbinsville Township, N.J. Amazon is holding a giant job fair Wednesday, Aug. 2, and plans to make thousands of job offers on the spot at nearly a dozen U.S. warehouses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
In this Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, photo, an Amazon employee makes sure a box riding on a belt is not sticking out at the Amazon Fulfillment center in Robbinsville Township, N.J. Amazon is holding a giant job fair Wednesday, Aug. 2, and plans to make thousands of job offers on the spot at nearly a dozen U.S. warehouses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) 

Denver has been here before, with a Seattle-based corporate behemoth considering a move that could bring many high-paying jobs to the region. Remember Boeing Corp.? Denver came in third behind Chicago and Dallas to lure the aerospace company’s headquarters despite offering a $15 million incentive package.

This time it’s Amazon, which announced last week it is looking for a city for a second headquarters campus. Though the online retailer is looking nationwide, a potential bid from Colorado gained buzz as The New York Times picked Denver as the leader among 52 cities in its own analysis.

“It’s like being chosen the Super Bowl winner before the season starts. You kind of put a target on your back,” joked veteran Denver developer Bill Mosher.

Still, Mosher, who has worked in commercial real estate for more than 30 years, said he believes Denver has a good shot.

“I think Denver and all the growth that’s been taking place here — and the metrics The New York Times utilized — are important. We stack up pretty well,” he said. The analysis looked at a range of factors including workforce, quality of life, transportation and government incentives.

Read the full story at Denver Post.

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