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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) woke up Tuesday to find his name trending on Twitter — linked overnight to a certain video from the “Milf Hunter” series, perhaps unfairly, perhaps irrevocably.

The clip itself is just over two minutes, details of its contents mostly unprintable. It features a sectional sofa, the pornographic actress Cory Chase, her fictitious nude stepdaughter, and a very energetic young man.

 

Cruz, of course, is nowhere to be seen in the footage, which has been floating around the Internet for more than a year. But around midnight Eastern time, someone signed into the senator’s official Twitter account and clicked a little heart below the video — and thus did @tedcruz “like” porn.

By late morning, reporters were waiting outside the U.S. Capitol to question the flesh-and-blood Cruz about his online alias’s handiwork, which he disavowed.

“It was a staffing issue and it was inadvertent,” the senator said. “It was a mistake.”

He said “a number of people” in his office had access to account — contra Jimmy Kimmel and much of the critical Internet, who had assumed the senator himself clicked the heart before someone else unclicked it, after so much viral mockery.

But Cruz wouldn’t name the mystery staffer, or say how they might be disciplined.

And twice that morning, reporters asked him if he himself was the liker.

“No,” Cruz said quietly as he finally walked away.

Cruz has watched porn on the Internet at least once, regardless of what happened on his Twitter account Monday night. He said so in his book “A Time for Truth: Reigniting the Promise of America.”

It was back in the 1990s, and all very proper.

Cruz at the time was a 26-year-old law clerk at the U.S. Supreme Court, which was deciding whether Internet porn should be regulated. Some justices decided they first needed to see the stuff for themselves, and so the young future senator got an eyeful.

“As we watched these graphic pictures fill our screens, wide-eyed, no one said a word,” Cruz wrote regarding some act involving a cantaloupe. “Except for Justice O’Connor, who lowered her head, squinted slightly, and muttered, ‘Oh, my.’ ”

Which is exactly the same thing @KieraGorden said in the small hours of the morning more than 20 years later, when she and what seems like half the conscious online population discovered the clip of stepmother and stepdaughter and sweaty male friend beneath the senator’s banner portrait.

It was gone by about 2 a.m., and the senator’s spokeswoman Catherine Frazier wrote shortly afterward on her own account: “The offensive tweet posted on @tedcruz account earlier has been removed by staff and reported to Twitter.”

That only raised more questions, including: Reported the tweet for what? A Twitter spokeswoman said the company never comments on individual accounts, though porn is allowed on the site, with some limitations.

Even if the details of its travels into @tedcruz’s column of “likes” remain a mystery, the video’s provenance is fairly clear.

It published in early 2016 on the porn site Reality Kings. “Cory has not been getting along with her step daughter Kacey lately,” reads the jacket blurb. They were getting along fine by the end of the film.

Then, as porn tends to, clips of the movie made their way across the Internet.

Early Monday morning, they entered the endless stream of tweets on the account known as @SexuallPosts.

And about 24 hours later, the owner of that account was among the first to learn that a U.S. senator’s name was listed among his contents’ endorsers.

Read the full story at The Washington Post.

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